News from the Appalachian Laboratory

Wind energy development has broad consequences for Golden Eagles

Roughly over a quarter of the golden eagles killed at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area in Northern California from 2012-2014 were recent immigrants to the local population, according to research led by the U.S. Geological Survey. The results illustrate how golden eagle populations are interconnected across the western U.S. and suggest that golden eagle deaths, or mitigation for those deaths, at one location may impact populations in other areas. 

Cleaner air may be driving improvements in Chesapeake Bay water quality

A new study suggests that improvements in air quality over the Potomac watershed, including the Washington, D.C., metro area, may be responsible for recent progress on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have linked improving water quality in streams and rivers of the Upper Potomac River Basin to reductions in nitrogen pollution onto the land and streams due to enforcement of the Clean Air Act. 

Chesapeake Bay health improves in 2015

Subtitle: 
One of three highest scores recorded since 1986

The overall health of Chesapeake Bay improved in 2015, according to scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. The largest estuary in the nation scored a C (53%) in 2015, one of the three highest scores since 1986. Only 1992 and 2002 scored as high or higher, both years of major sustained droughts.

UMCES graduates next generation of science leaders

The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s third annual Commencement ceremony was held on May 10 at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory and featured Maryland Secretary of the Environment Ben Grumbles as keynote speaker. He told graduates, “Don’t ever get tired for searching for finding innovative, cost effective, surprising solutions that really do save us from ourselves and provide for a brighter future.” 

Johnson Award and Event Corporate Sponsors

2016 Richard A. Johnson Environmental Education Award and Event Corporate Sponsors

2016 Appalachian Laboratory Open House

Appalachian Laboratory hosts Open House - Saturday, May 7th

Scientists track down origin of bats killed by wind turbines using chemical fingerprints

Subtitle: 
Study is step toward understanding how to help bats impacted by wind-energy development

Wind energy is a growing alternative to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels. However, one impact of large-scale wind energy development has been widespread mortality of bats. A new study from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science tracks down the origin of bats killed by wind turbines in the Appalachian region in hopes of better understanding the risks to affected populations.

Laying the groundwork: The science behind the decision-making

Since its founding, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s work has lead to groundbreaking discoveries that have changed the way we think about our environment. The pace continues today as cutting-edge research focuses on important issues—from turning algae into biofuel to predicting the impact of climate change—to provide a scientific foundation key to planning for our state and nation’s future.

Evergreen founder Janice Keene joins UMCES Board of Visitors

The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Maryland’s leading research institution aimed at advancing scientific knowledge of the environment, recently appointed Janice Keene, founder and president of the Evergreen Heritage Center Foundation in western Maryland, to its Board of Visitors.  

Evergreen Heritage Center Founder Janice Keene Joins UMCES Board of Visitors

FROSTBURG, MD (February 10, 2016)—The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Maryland’s leading research institution aimed at advancing scientific knowledge of the environment, recently appointed Janice Keene, founder and president of the Evergreen Heritage Center Foundation in western Maryland, to its Board of Visitors.