Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

UMCES scientists win Best Paper of the Year award from American Fisheries Society

New book shows how the last four decades of technological advances have uncovered hidden migration behaviors of fish

"Imagine the clandestine lives of marine fishes,” begins “Migration Ecology of Marine Fishes,”

Maryland blue crab expert Tom Miller receives highest university award for public service

When Professor Tom Miller first arrived at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s historic Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 20 years ago, he knew little about blue crabs.

Alliance for Coastal Technologies

Maritime Environmental Resource Center

New forecast tool helps ships avoid blue whale hotspots

Scientists have long used satellite tags to track blue whales along the West Coast, learning how the largest animals on the planet find enough small krill to feed on to support their enormous size. Now researchers from NOAA Fisheries, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, and Oregon State University have combined that trove of tracking data with satellite observations of ocean conditions to develop the first system for predicting locations of blue whales off the West Coast.

New forecast tool helps ships avoid blue whale hotspots

Subtitle: 
Satellite tracking informs maps of blue whale density off West Coast

SOLOMONS, MD (November 29, 2016)--Scientists have long used satellite tags to track blue whales along the West Coast, learning how the largest animals on the planet find enough small krill to feed on to support their enormous size. Now researchers from NOAA Fisheries, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, and Oregon State University have combined that trove of tracking data with satellite observations of ocean conditions to develop the first system for predicting locations of blue whales off the West Coast.

New forecast tool helps ships avoid blue whale hotspots

Subtitle: 
Satellite tracking informs maps of blue whale density off West Coast

Scientists have long used satellite tags to track blue whales along the West Coast, learning how the largest animals on the planet find enough small krill to feed on to support their enormous size. Now researchers from NOAA Fisheries, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, and Oregon State University have combined that trove of tracking data with satellite observations of ocean conditions to develop the first system for predicting locations of blue whales off the West Coast.

Faculty Research Assistant - Contractual Hourly

Closing Date: 
12/15/2016

Faculty Research Assistant - Contractual

Assistant Director for Development

Closing Date: 
12/15/2016

Assistant Director for Development

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