Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology

Ammar Hanif succesfully defends master's research

Ammar Hanif, advised by Dr. Eric Schott and co-advised by Dr. Rose Jagus, presented the results of his master's research to the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology on November 16, 2012, and successfully defended his work a few days later.

NOAA funds study to explore impact of oil spills on blue crab development

A new study by scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science will help determine the potential impact of an oil spill on the development of the blue crab. NOAA and the Coastal Response Research Center at the University of New Hampshire has awarded a $150,000 grant for a one-year study of the effects of chemical dispersants and dispersed oil on larvae of the commercially important blue crab, a keystone species of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coast, and its larvae.

New study finds that bacteria on marine sponges can develop capacity to move and inhibit biofilm formation

A new study shows that when enough bacteria get together in one place, they can make a collective decision to grow an appendage and swim away. This type of behavior has been seen for the first time in marine sponges, and could lead to an understanding of how to break up harmful bacterial biofilms, such as plaque on teeth or those found on internal medical devices like artificial heart valves.

Environmental leaders gather to discuss Chesapeake Bay and human health

"Stop acting like we're bulletproof" urged Congressman Elijah Cummings at the kick off of a two-day conference on the Chesapeake Bay and human health at the Institute for Marine and Environmental Science at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, May 14-15.

Student Research Day Held at UMCES-IMET

Student interns presented their summer research in marine and environmental technology at the Student Research Day held at UMCES-IMET on Friday August 5.

UMCES@IMET Student Earns Aquaculture Scholarship

UMCES graduate student Aaron Watson has been awarded the M.P. Mulvihill Aquaculture Student Scholarship by the United States Aquaculture Society to support his studies at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology.

Blue Crab Research May Help Chesapeake Bay Watermen Improve Soft Shell Harvest

A research effort designed to prevent the introduction of viruses to blue crabs in a research hatchery could end up helping Chesapeake Bay watermen improve their bottom line by reducing the number of soft shell crabs perishing before reaching the market. The findings, published in the journal Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, shows that the transmission of a crab-specific virus in diseased and dying crabs likely occurs after the pre-molt (or ‘peeler’) crabs are removed from the wild and placed in soft-shell production facilities.

UMCES@IMET Scientists Attend IMBC 2010

Marine biotechnology leaders from across the globe recently gathered at the Ninth Annual International Marine Biotechnology Conference (IMBC) in Qing

Budding Scientists Learn from UMCES@IMET Researchers

Summer program opens undergraduates to world of biotechnology

lmrcsc studentOver the summer, excited young faces adorned laboratories throughout the Institute for Marine and Environmental Technology. Through their work, they have explored the waters of the Chesapeake Bay, developed a deeper understanding of the biology of the blue crab and peered at algae samples through microscopes. Yet, their lifelong experience in scientific research is likely only beginning.

Entrepreneurs Fellowship Program helps young scientists

Subtitle: 
Environmental entrepreneurs complete first semester of program that brings students and business leaders together at Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology

Graduate students at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology (IMET) in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor recently completed the first semester of an entrepreneurial boot camp focusing on basic business principles, venture capital and entrepreneurism. The Ratcliffe Environmental Entrepreneurs Fellowship Program was established in June 2014 with funding from the Philip E. and Carole R. Ratcliffe Foundation to help young scientists cultivate the leadership and business skills necessary to bring their bench research into commercial markets.

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