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New book shows how the last four decades of technological advances have uncovered hidden migration behaviors of fish

"Imagine the clandestine lives of marine fishes,” begins “Migration Ecology of Marine Fishes,”

New study finds that bacteria on marine sponges can develop capacity to move and inhibit biofilm formation

A new study shows that when enough bacteria get together in one place, they can make a collective decision to grow an appendage and swim away. This type of behavior has been seen for the first time in marine sponges, and could lead to an understanding of how to break up harmful bacterial biofilms, such as plaque on teeth or those found on internal medical devices like artificial heart valves.

Environmental leaders gather to discuss Chesapeake Bay and human health

"Stop acting like we're bulletproof" urged Congressman Elijah Cummings at the kick off of a two-day conference on the Chesapeake Bay and human health at the Institute for Marine and Environmental Science at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, May 14-15.

Chesapeake Oyster Population Less Than One Percent of Historic Levels - Overfishing, disease, and habitat loss have led to continued declines in Maryland’s portion of the Bay

Solomons, Md. (August 31, 2011) – According to recent research, published in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series (Vol. 436), the oyster population in the upper Chesapeake Bay has been estimated to be 0.3% of population levels of early 1800s due to overfishing, disease, and habitat loss.

Blue Crab Research May Help Chesapeake Bay Watermen Improve Soft Shell Harvest

A research effort designed to prevent the introduction of viruses to blue crabs in a research hatchery could end up helping Chesapeake Bay watermen improve their bottom line by reducing the number of soft shell crabs perishing before reaching the market. The findings, published in the journal Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, shows that the transmission of a crab-specific virus in diseased and dying crabs likely occurs after the pre-molt (or ‘peeler’) crabs are removed from the wild and placed in soft-shell production facilities.

UMCES Scientists Lead Call for Moratorium on Mountaintop Mining Permits

Based on a comprehensive analysis of the latest scientific findings and new data, UMCES researchers Dr. Margaret Palmer and Dr. Keith Eshleman are leading a group of leading environmental scientists calling on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S Army Corps of Engineers to stay all new mountaintop mining permits.

Dr. Jacqueline Grebmeier honored with President’s Award for Science Application

Dr. Jaqueline Grebmeier has seen the impact of climate change on the Arctic first-hand.

Dr. Jacqueline Grebmeier honored with President’s Award for Science Application

Dr. Jaqueline Grebmeier has seen the impact of climate change on the Arctic first-hand. A research professor and biological oceanographer at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, she has been working for more than 30 years to understand how Arctic marine ecosystems respond to environmental changes. This spring, she was given the President's Award for Excellence in Application of Science for her exceptional and sustained contributions to the understanding of the Arctic.

Chesapeake Bay health improves in 2015

Subtitle: 
One of three highest scores recorded since 1986

The overall health of Chesapeake Bay improved in 2015, according to scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. The largest estuary in the nation scored a C (53%) in 2015, one of the three highest scores since 1986. Only 1992 and 2002 scored as high or higher, both years of major sustained droughts.

UMCES graduates next generation of science leaders

The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s third annual Commencement ceremony was held on May 10 at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory and featured Maryland Secretary of the Environment Ben Grumbles as keynote speaker. He told graduates, “Don’t ever get tired for searching for finding innovative, cost effective, surprising solutions that really do save us from ourselves and provide for a brighter future.” 

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