News from the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

NOAA funds study to explore impact of oil spills on blue crab development

A new study by scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science will help determine the potential impact of an oil spill on the development of the blue crab. NOAA and the Coastal Response Research Center at the University of New Hampshire has awarded a $150,000 grant for a one-year study of the effects of chemical dispersants and dispersed oil on larvae of the commercially important blue crab, a keystone species of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coast, and its larvae.

Dr. Mario Tamburri honored with President’s Award for Science Application

Dr. Mario Tamburri, Research Professor at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory and an expert in coastal observing systems, has been honored by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science with the President's Award for Excellence in Application of Science. Tamburri was recognized for his leadership in applying innovative and well-tested environmental sensor technologies and in steadfastly working to reduce the risk of invasive species through maritime transportation.

Commencement 2015: UMCES graduates the next generation of scientific leaders

The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s second annual Commencement ceremony was held on Friday, May 1, at the Maryland Inn in Annapolis and featured Dr. Holly A. Bamford ’02, Acting Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Management for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, as keynote speaker. She told graduates to "take the leap" toward challenges that will come.

Professor Tom Miller receives highest university award for public service

When Professor Tom Miller first arrived at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s historic Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 20 years ago, he knew little about blue crabs. Today, he knows more than most people in Maryland and has been at the forefront in advances in blue crab management in the Chesapeake Bay. This Friday, the University System of Maryland (USM) Board of Regents honored Dr. Miller the 2015 USM Regents’ Faculty Award for Public Service, the highest honor that the Board bestows to recognize exemplary faculty achievement.

Dr. Jacqueline Grebmeier awarded IASC Medal

Subtitle: 
Recognized for 30-year career working to understand how Arctic marine ecosystems respond to environmental change

Dr. Jacqueline Grebmeier, research professor and a biological oceanographer at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), has been recognized for exceptional and sustained contributions to the understanding of the Arctic by the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), an international scientific organization that supports leading-edge research through coordination by 22 member countries with Arctic research programs.

UMCES Scientists to Study Water Quality Consequences of Susquehanna River Sediments and Nutrients

A team of scientists at University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) is beginning a two-year study to quantify the amount of sediment and associated nutrients present in major entry points to the Lower Susquehanna River Reservoir System and the upper Chesapeake Bay. UMCES scientists are building on a recent assessment led by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that analyzed the movement of sediment and associated nutrient loads through the lower Susquehanna River watershed to the upper Chesapeake Bay. Although the entire Lower Reservoir System will be investigated, special emphasis will be given to sediment and nutrient loads into and out of Conowingo Pond during high flow events. This study will help policymakers determine the best management options to reduce this effect.

Bay experts Boesch and Boynton earn rank of Admiral of the Chesapeake Bay

Award recognizes the lifetime achievement and is the highest honor the governor can bestow on a person for their environmental contributions. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science President Donald Boesch and Professor Walt Boynton were recognized as an “Admiral of the Chesapeake” by outgoing Governor Martin O’Malley during his final days in office.

Arctic scientists receive marine research award

Biologists Jacqueline Grebmeier and Lee Cooper received an Alaska Ocean Leadership Award from the Alaska SeaLife Center in January. The awards are given annually to individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to the awareness and sustainability of the state’s marine resources.

Underwater microphones will track impact of offshore wind power on marine life along the coast

Offshore wind farms will allow renewable energy to be generated with little or no carbon dioxide emissions, but little  is known about how they impact the marine species living and migrating along the coast. A new study led by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science will help State and Federal decision-makers better understand where whales, dolphins and porpoises occur along the coast off of Ocean City, and how they use this habitat. This information will assist in determining the best way to develop wind farms in order to minimize disruption or harm to marine life in the area.