News Releases

SOLOMONS, MD (April 10, 2015)—When Professor Tom Miller first arrived at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s historic Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 20 years ago, he knew little about blue crabs. Today, he knows more than most people in Maryland and has been at the forefront in advances in blue crab management in the Chesapeake Bay. This Friday, the University System of Maryland (USM) Board of Regents honored Dr. Miller the 2015 USM Regents’ Faculty Award for Public Service, the highest honor that the Board bestows to recognize exemplary faculty achievement.

Recognized for 30-year career working to understand how Arctic marine ecosystems respond to environmental change

SOLOMONS, MD (March 10, 2015)--Dr. Jacqueline Grebmeier, research professor and a biological oceanographer at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), has been recognized for exceptional and sustained contributions to the understanding of the Arctic by the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), an international scientific organization that supports leading-edge research through coordination by 22 member countries with Arctic research programs. Her research is focused on understanding how arctic marine ecosystems respond to environmental change, particularly efforts that illuminate the importance of biological systems living on the bottom of Arctic seas.

CAMBRIDGE, MD (February 19, 2015)—A team of scientists at University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) is beginning a two-year study to quantify the amount of sediment and associated nutrients present in major entry points to the Lower Susquehanna River Reservoir System and the upper Chesapeake Bay. UMCES scientists are building on a recent assessment led by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that analyzed the movement of sediment and associated nutrient loads through the lower Susquehanna River watershed to the upper Chesapeake Bay. Although the entire Lower Reservoir System will be investigated, special emphasis will be given to sediment and nutrient loads into and out of Conowingo Pond during high flow events. This study will help policymakers determine the best management options to reduce this effect.

SOLOMONS, MD (November 4, 2014)--Offshore wind farms will allow renewable energy to be generated with little or no carbon dioxide emissions, but little  is known about how they impact the marine species living and migrating along the coast. A new study led by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science will help State and Federal decision-makers better understand where whales, dolphins and porpoises occur along the coast off of Ocean City, and how they use this habitat. This information will assist in determining the best way to develop wind farms in order to minimize disruption or harm to marine life in the area.

SOLOMONS, MD (October 16, 2014)--Offshore wind power is a valuable source of renewable energy that can help reduce carbon emissions. Technological advances are allowing higher capacity turbines to be installed in deeper water, but there is still much unknown about the effects on the environment. In a recent paper, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science researcher Helen Bailey and colleagues review the potential impacts of offshore wind developments on marine species and make recommendations for future monitoring and assessment as interest in offshore wind energy grows around the world.