Chesapeake Biological Laboratory Students

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Name/Title Lab/Description Contact Information
Alec Armstrong
Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

Reed Brodnik
Ph.D. Graduate Research Student
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
410-326-7215
Erin Crandall
Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

Matthew Damiano
Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
Fisheries Science, Population Dynamics, Marine Fisheries Management

Steve Epting
Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

Rosemary Fanelli
PhD student
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
Groundwater-surface water interactions, watershed hydrology, freshwater biogeochemistry

Jessica Foley
Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
Environmental Science, M.S.
410-326-7216
Brian Gallagher
Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
Influence of climate change on partial migration in Hudson River white perch
410-326-7225
Christina Goethel
Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
410-326-7388
Aimee Hoover
Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
410-326-7296
Kevin Kahover
Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
410-326-4281
Agraj Khare
Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

Hillary Lane Glandon
Graduate Research Assistant
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
I am broadly interested in the physiological response to species to environmental stressors and how these responses may be manifested on an ecosystem scale. Understanding the impact of environmental stressors such as ocean warming, acidification, pollution, and hypoxia is critical to predicting the future status of marine ecosystems worldwide. I am specifically interested in utilizing information on the response of species that live in variable environments such as the estuary and intertidal zones, where individuals are exposed to extreme conditions with regularity, to predict how species that live in more stable environments might respond to those same conditions. In addition to being a natural laboratory for environmental variability, nearshore environments are in direct contact with coastal communities, making these systems ideal for examining the ecological, economic, and anthropological impacts of environmental change.
410-326-7420
Emily Liljestrand
Graduate Student
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
Quantitative Ecology, Fisheries Sciences
(410)-326-7355
Jenna Luek
Ph.D Student
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
Organic contaminant cycling, trace metal geochemistry, analytical chemistry
410-326-7408