News from UMCES@IMET

Ammar Hanif succesfully defends master's research

Ammar Hanif, advised by Dr. Eric Schott and co-advised by Dr. Rose Jagus, presented the results of his master's research to the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology on November 16, 2012, and successfully defended his work a few days later.

NOAA funds study to explore impact of oil spills on blue crab development

A new study by scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science will help determine the potential impact of an oil spill on the development of the blue crab. NOAA and the Coastal Response Research Center at the University of New Hampshire has awarded a $150,000 grant for a one-year study of the effects of chemical dispersants and dispersed oil on larvae of the commercially important blue crab, a keystone species of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coast, and its larvae.

New study finds that bacteria on marine sponges can develop capacity to move and inhibit biofilm formation

A new study shows that when enough bacteria get together in one place, they can make a collective decision to grow an appendage and swim away. This type of behavior has been seen for the first time in marine sponges, and could lead to an understanding of how to break up harmful bacterial biofilms, such as plaque on teeth or those found on internal medical devices like artificial heart valves.

Environmental leaders gather to discuss Chesapeake Bay and human health

"Stop acting like we're bulletproof" urged Congressman Elijah Cummings at the kick off of a two-day conference on the Chesapeake Bay and human health at the Institute for Marine and Environmental Science at Baltimore's Inner Harbor, May 14-15.

Student Research Day Held at UMCES-IMET

Student interns presented their summer research in marine and environmental technology at the Student Research Day held at UMCES-IMET on Friday August 5.

UMCES@IMET Student Earns Aquaculture Scholarship

UMCES graduate student Aaron Watson has been awarded the M.P. Mulvihill Aquaculture Student Scholarship by the United States Aquaculture Society to support his studies at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology.

UMCES@IMET Scientists Attend IMBC 2010

Marine biotechnology leaders from across the globe recently gathered at the Ninth Annual International Marine Biotechnology Conference (IMBC) in Qing

Dr. Russell Hill elected to American Academy of Microbiology

Dr. Russell Hill, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science americaprofessor and director of the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, has been elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology. The Academy, the honorific leadership group within the American Society for Microbiology, recognizes excellence, originality, and leadership in the microbiological sciences, and election to this group is a mark of distinction. Academy Fellows are eminent leaders in the field of microbiology and are relied upon for authoritative advice and insight on critical issues in microbiology.

Dr. Russell Hill Chosen for Leadership Maryland Class of 2015

Dr. Russell T. Hill, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science professor and director of the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Baltimore, has been chosen by Leadership Maryland to participate in the prestigious professional development program dedicated to building a stronger Maryland by educating, cultivating and connecting our state’s brightest leaders. Professor Hill is one of 50 Maryland leaders chosen for Leadership Maryland’s 23rd class – the Class of 2015 – who will complete the eight-month hands-on learning program focused on the state’s most vital social, economic and environmental issues.

Bacteria in marine sponges harvest phosphorus for the reef community

Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear. For the first time scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology have identified that bacteria on sponges are harvesting phosphorus from the water for the reef ecosystem to use for nourishment. The findings were published in the February 23 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.