News

Kelly Pearce Presented Outstanding Wildlife Award

March 30, 2016
Ms. Kelly Pearce was recently presented with the Outstanding Wildlife Student Award by the MD-DE Chapter of The Wildlife Society. Ms. Pearce is a PhD candidate in the Marine Estuarine and Environmental Science Program at the University of Maryland, College Park, and her studies are based at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science-Appalachian Laboratory.

2016 Appalachian Laboratory Open House

March 25, 2016
The Frostburg-based lab invites the public to learn about science with hands-on experiments for the whole family, meet the scientists working in your community, and enjoy aerial drone demonstrations to learn how scientists at AL are using this technology to enhance their research efforts.

Scientists track down origin of bats killed by wind turbines using chemical fingerprints

March 16, 2016
Wind energy is a growing alternative to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels. However, one impact of large-scale wind energy development has been widespread mortality of bats. A new study from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science tracks down the origin of bats killed by wind turbines in the Appalachian region in hopes of better understanding the risks to affected populations.

Pollution control policies effective in improving downwind air quality

December 9, 2015
Emissions controls on coal-fired power plants are making a difference in reducing exposure of mercury to people, especially in the western Maryland community. A study of air quality from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science found that levels of mercury in the air from power plant emissions dropped more than half over a 10-year period, coinciding with stricter pollution controls.

Hungry planet requires more efficient use of nitrogen

November 23, 2015
The global population is expected to increase by two to three billion people by 2050, a projection raising serious concerns about sustainable development, biodiversity and food security. Given the world’s growing food demands, nitrogen fertilizer use is likely to increase. Using too much fertilizer, however, will lead to increased pollution of waterways and the air.

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