News

Study finds human-caused global warming began earlier than expected

August 22, 2016
An international research project has shown that the increases in temperatures we are witnessing today started about 180 years ago and confirms previous findings that human activity is the cause of modern global warming.

Open innovation challenge brings new approaches to reduce nutrients in waterways

June 28, 2016
A technology challenge to developing better and cheaper nutrient sensors made the White House's Top 100 list of projects making an impact in American science, technology, and innovation. Mario Tamburri, director of the Alliance for Coastal Technologies at the UMCES' Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, has been a key member of the Challenging Nutrients Coalition, a national inter-agency initiative working to improve our ability to measure and understand nutrient pollution.

Dr. Jacqueline Grebmeier honored with President’s Award for Science Application

May 18, 2016
Dr. Jaqueline Grebmeier has seen the impact of climate change on the Arctic first-hand. A research professor and biological oceanographer at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, she has been working for more than 30 years to understand how Arctic marine ecosystems respond to environmental changes. This spring, she was given the President's Award for Excellence in Application of Science for her exceptional and sustained contributions to the understanding of the Arctic.

Bernie Fowler Honored by Maryland State House and Senate

February 19, 2016
CBL offers our heartiest congratulations to Senator Bernard “Bernie” Fowler, who was honored by the Maryland House and Senate on Tuesday for his 50 years of service in cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay!

Helping Local Planners Improve the Quality of Coastal Bays

February 5, 2016
More people have moved to the Delmarva Peninsula in recent years, drawn by the charms of living near the coast. But that growth has also stressed the ecology of fragile, shallow coastal bays that border the Atlantic Ocean. These stresses, in places like Sinepuxent and Chincoteague Bays, parallel on a smaller scale those plaguing the much-larger Chesapeake Bay estuary nearby.

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