UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

Our researchers are recognized for their ability to explain today’s complex issues in ways that help non-scientists better understand our environment.

To reach an expert, contact Amy Pelsinsky at 410-330-1390 or apelsinsky@umces.edu.

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The Washington Post
2016-08-08

Six years ago, in a bracing TED talk, coral reef scientist Jeremy Jackson laid out "how we wrecked the ocean." In the talk, he detailed not only how overfishing, global warming, and various forms o

Billings Gazette
2016-08-07

In Montana, even the prairie dogs are honored. Or at least they have their own state park.

The Star Democrat
2016-08-05

EASTON — A prolonged heat wave could be behind low dissolved oxygen levels in the Chesapeake Bay in late July, according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Bay Journal
2016-08-04

J. Carter Fox had heard the stories of the once-robust Chesapeake Bay oyster grounds.

Nature World News
2016-08-04

Extreme weather events have an impact to fish's environment, as per a study.

Fed Scoop
2016-08-03

Contests and challenges have become an important way for federal agencies to find tech-based solutions to some of the most serious environmental problems affecting our planet's oceans and animals.

CBS Baltimore
2016-08-03

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Just when it looked like the Chesapeake Bay was getting a break, a big setback has hit.

Physorg
2016-08-02

Striped bass are known to have favorite summer swimming spots to which they return every year. They are creatures of habit. However, when a hurricane hits, everything can change very quickly.

Science Newsline
2016-08-02

SOLOMONS, MD (August 2, 2016) -- Striped bass are known to have favorite summer swimming spots to which they return every year. They are creatures of habit.

Bay Journal
2016-08-02

A Maryland commission last night gave a grudging, conditional nod to going ahead with oyster restoration work in the Tred Avon River, which had drawn fire from the state's watermen.