UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

Our researchers are recognized for their ability to explain today’s complex issues in ways that help non-scientists better understand our environment.

To reach an expert, contact Amy Pelsinsky at 410-330-1390 or apelsinsky@umces.edu.

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CBS Baltimore
2015-05-11

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Algae blooms, some of them toxic, are increasing in the Chesapeake.

Physorg
2015-05-05

Determining whether estuaries and tidal wetlands are net emitters or absorbers of carbon dioxide is the object of a NASA-funded study by a national team of researchers.

Bay Journal
2015-05-04

It took more than two years — and endless hours of frustration — before biologists found their first sturgeon on Marshyhope Creek.

The National Law Review
2015-05-04

Legislative Updates

The New York Times
2015-05-02

BALTIMORE — IN Tom Stoppard's play "Arcadia," the mathematician Valentine tries to predict how the grouse population on an estate changes from year to year.

Cumberland Times-News
2015-04-30

FROSTBURG — For the third year in a row, Citizens Restoring American Chestnuts will give away American chestnut seedlings and seeds to anyone who is interested in contributing to science while at

Southern Maryland News
2015-04-29

ANNAPOLIS -- The Maryland Department of Natural Resources on Monday released the 2015 Blue Crab Winter Dredge Survey results, which showed the abundance of spawning-age females was 101 million, a s

Southern Maryland News
2015-04-28

In 1925, when Dr.

The Cecil Whig
2015-04-28

EASTON — The 2015 Winter Dredge Survey for blue crabs showed a better outlook on the crab population, a shift from the depleted levels of last year, according to Maryland Department of Natural Reso

The Outdoor Wire
2015-04-28

Adult females are no longer depleted, but remain at low levels