UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

Our researchers are recognized for their ability to explain today’s complex issues in ways that help non-scientists better understand our environment.

To reach an expert, contact Amy Pelsinsky at 410-330-1390 or apelsinsky@umces.edu.

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The Baltimore Sun
2015-02-25

For months, the mantra of the Western Maryland delegation in Annapolis has been "Restore the highway user fees!"

Terra Daily
2015-02-24

Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear.

Science Newsline
2015-02-23

BALTIMORE, MD (February 23, 2015)--Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs?

Physorg
2015-02-23

Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear.

Science Daily
2015-02-23

Did you ever wonder why the water is so clear around coral reefs? Scientists have known for years that sponges can filter water and gather nutrients from the ocean, making it appear crystal clear.

The Star Democrat
2015-02-20

CAMBRIDGE — A team of scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science is starting a two-year study to determine the amount of sediment and associated nutrients present in

The Baltimore Sun B'More Green Blog
2015-02-20

Wading into a politically fraught issue, a team of Maryland scientists is trying to pin down how much of the sediment and nutrient pollution fouling the Chesapeake Bay after big storms comes from t

My Eastern Shore MD
2015-02-20

CAMBRIDGE — A team of scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science is starting a two-year study to determine the amount of sediment and associated nutrients present in

The Talbot Spy
2015-02-19

A team of scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) is beginning a two-year study to quantify the amount of sediment and associated nutrients present in majo

The Diamondback
2015-02-17

Oysters are the "kidney" of the Chesapeake Bay, filtering up to 50 gallons of water, algae, sediment and nitrogen each day, according to the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.