UPDATE: Indoor masking in common spaces required; weekly testing for unvaccinated employees.

UMCES

Community Learning

Online Seminars

UMCES offers opportunities to engage with our expert faculty online through free public seminars.


 

Future wildland fire: Land management and climate change

Tuesday, October 5, 2021, 7 p.m.
Mark Cochrane, UMCES Appalachian Laboratory

Every year we seem to hear of more and more catastrophic wildfires burning here and abroad. The trend is real but the predicament that we face with future wildland fires is the result of both earlier land management actions and the growing influence of climate change. To adapt to changing conditions and mitigate the threats posed by future wildfires, a paradigm shift is needed in how societies view and manage wildfire. REGISTER

This is part of the Science for Communities webinar series organized by UMCES’ Chesapeake Biological Laboratory.

Climate impacts on golden tilefish: Past and present

Tuesday, October 12, 2021, 7 p.m.
Genny Nesslage, UMCES Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

Golden tilefish is a large, bottom-dwelling marine fish that is particularly susceptible to climate change because it can tolerate only a very narrow range of temperatures. In 1882, millions of golden tilefish died due to an unusually strong influx of Arctic water into the Mid-Atlantic. Dr. Nesslage will describe past and present research on the linkage between climate and trends in the golden tilefish fishery. REGISTER

This is part of the Science for Communities webinar series organized by UMCES’ Chesapeake Biological Laboratory.

Climate warming and the changing Pacific Arctic marine ecosystem

Tuesday, October 19, 2021, 7 p.m.
 Jackie Grebmeier, UMCES Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

The Bering and Chukchi Seas in the Arctic are undergoing dramatic sea ice reduction and warming conditions that are shifting the composition of bottom-dwelling prey for marine mammals, seabirds, and commercial fish in the region. Field studies by scientists are tracking ecosystem status and trends. In this webinar, internationally recognized Arctic expert Dr. Grebmeier will share highlights of scientific findings from the rapidly changing Arctic. REGISTER

This is part of the Science for Communities webinar series organized by UMCES’ Chesapeake Biological Laboratory.

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: Ins, outs, & demands of serving as lead author of Working Group II

Flooding along Elliotts Island Rd. in Dorchester County. Photo by Guy W. Willey Sr.

Tuesday, October 26, 2021, 7 p.m.
Libby Jewett, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

As part of a multi-year global climate change assessment process, Working Group II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is assessing the vulnerability of socio-economic and natural systems to climate change and options for adapting to it. As lead author, Dr. Jewett will discuss the rigorous process and extensive scientific review through which the report must pass prior to its expected release in 2022. REGISTER

This is part of the Science for Communities webinar series organized by UMCES’ Chesapeake Biological Laboratory.

Risk assessment in the face of climate change

Tuesday, November 2, 2021, 7 p.m.

Slava Lyubchich, UMCES Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

Traditionally, long-term observations have been a key component in assessing the risks of weather-induced losses. However, most recent climate trends require the inclusion of future climate projections into the methods and models used to assess the risks. In this seminar, Dr. Lyubchich will discuss how this step has important implications for building codes, pricing agricultural and home insurance. REGISTER
 

This is part of the Science for Communities webinar series organized by UMCES’ Chesapeake Biological Laboratory.

Vulture: The Private Life of an Unloved Bird

Thursday, November 4, 6:30 p.m.
Katie FallonAvian Conservation Center of Appalachia (ACCA), Inc

Vultures are often overlooked, under appreciated, and unloved, despite the vital role they play healthy ecosystems. Worldwide, vultures are more likely to be threatened or endangered than any other group of raptor, but in the United States Turkey and Black Vultures may be increasing in number. Based on Katie Fallon’s recent book, this fun presentation will discuss the life and times of the noble Turkey Vulture, including its feeding, nesting, and roosting habits, migratory behaviors, and common misconceptions. Fallon is one of the founders of the Avian Conservation Center of Appalachia (ACCA), Inc., a nonprofit organization dedicated to conserving wild birds through research, education, and rehabilitation. REGISTER

This is part of the Watershed Moments Community Learning series organized by UMCES’ Appalachian  Laboratory.

Captain George W. Brown & Black Maritime Legacy

October 8, 2021 | 12 p.m. EST

For over 30 years, Captain George W. Brown was one of Baltimore’s most prominent and beloved Black business leaders. As a steamboat owner and captain in the early 1900s, he was an indomitable mariner, as well as the founder and manager of Brown’s Grove. Served by his steamboats, the popular destination on Rock Creek was one of the few Black waterfront resorts that operated in the area at that time.