UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

Our researchers are recognized for their ability to explain today’s complex issues in ways that help non-scientists better understand our environment.

To reach an expert, contact Amy Pelsinsky at 410-330-1390 or apelsinsky@umces.edu.

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The Bay Net News
2011-11-29

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science Professor Ed Houde received the American Fisheries Society's Elbert H.

The Baltimore Examiner
2011-11-25

A few years back when the Turnpike Authority wanted to widen the Garden State Parkway along the New Jersey Pinelands, plans also included strategies for saving the indigenous wildlife (frogs, snake

The Frederick News-Post
2011-11-25

In a new twist on an old joke, researchers are asking: Why did the raccoon cross the highway, when it could have used the drainage culvert underneath?

Underwater Times
2011-11-18

BALTIMORE, Maryland -- Efforts to reduce the flow of fertilizers, animal waste and other pollutants into the Chesapeake Bay appear to be giving a boost to the bay's health, a new study that analyze

NOAA News
2011-11-16

NOAA's Office of Education announced that it has awarded grants totaling $10.8 million to four lead minority-serving institutions across the country to train and graduate students who pursue applie

WBOC
2011-11-15

A new study finds the health of the Chesapeake Bay is improving. That's because the mid-to late summer "oxygen-starved areas" of the bay are decreasing.

Delaware Online
2011-11-14

Efforts to reduce nutrient pollution flows to Chesapeake Bay appear to be working, because data show the size of oxygen-starved "dead zones" in the bay has been declining.

WYPR (NPR) - Maryland Morning Radio Program
2011-11-14

Every summer, what's known as a "dead zone" forms in the Chesapeake Bay – called "dead" because the amount of oxygen drops so low, fish and shellfish struggle to survive.

The Baltimore Sun B'More Green Blog
2011-11-14

Raccoons, deer, cats, birds, turtles, even humans - all will make tracks under busy highways when they can, or must.

The Asbury Park (NJ) Press
2011-11-13

Efforts to reduce nutrient pollution flows to Chesapeake Bay appear to be working, because data show the size of oxygen-starved "dead zones" in the bay has been declining -- offering hope that a si