UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

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WBAL (Baltimore) Television
2011-11-04

ANNAPOLIS, Md. -- A new study found that dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay are getting smaller.

WBOC
2011-11-04

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP)- A new study finds dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay are getting smaller.

The Baltimore Sun
2011-11-03

Efforts to reduce pollution of the Chesapeake Bay are starting to pay off, a major new study says, finding that despite weather-driven ups and downs, the "dead zone" that stresses fish and shellfis

ABC27
2011-11-03

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) - A new study finds dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay are getting smaller.

The Daily Record
2011-11-03

ANNAPOLIS — A new study finds dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay are getting smaller.

E! Science News
2011-11-03

Efforts to reduce the flow of fertilizers, animal waste and other pollutants into the Chesapeake Bay appear to be giving a boost to the bay's health, a new study that analyzed 60 years of water qua

Fox 45 TV
2011-11-03

A new study finds dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay are getting smaller.

CBS Baltimore
2011-11-03

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — A new study finds dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay are getting smaller.

Marine News
2011-10-01

It was perhaps no coincidence that the dedication of the Maritime Environmental Research Center's (MERC) barge-based Mobile Test Platform coincided perfectly with the latest meeting of the Great La

The Baltimore Sun
2011-11-02

Scientists from the National Aquarium and the Johns Hopkins University say they've found low but potentially harmful levels of toxic oil contaminants in the Gulf of Mexico months after the Deepwate