UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

Our researchers are recognized for their ability to explain today’s complex issues in ways that help non-scientists better understand our environment.

To reach an expert, contact Amy Pelsinsky at 410-330-1390 or apelsinsky@umces.edu.

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The Cumberland Times-News
2010-02-24

February 17, 2010 — FROSTBURG — NASA astronaut and Frostburg State University alumnus Ricky Arnold will return to the Frostburg campus to speak about his work as a mission specialist, which

The Cumberland Times-News
2010-02-21

FROSTBURG ­— Cassie Doty had to work around the snow drifts Friday.

Cape Cod (MA) Times
2010-02-21

Brian Howes is the man behind the numbers.

The Washington Post
2010-02-18

Q: As the controversy swirling around the IPCC deepens at the same time some are questioning the significance of global warming now that large portions of the U.S.

The Salisbury Daily Times
2010-02-14

SALISBURY -- Scientific experts on the Chesapeake Bay told an audience at Salisbury University on Saturday what most who gathered already knew:

Cape Cod (MA) Times
2010-02-14

In Brian Howes' marine lab on the New Bedford waterfront, bags of used Petri dishes bulge from beneath counters.

The Washington Post
2010-02-13

To nature, snow is potential. It is rainwater, waiting for a cue.

The Salisbury Daily Times
2010-02-12

SALISBURY — The most studied body of water on earth has gotten the most attention from a handful of scientists whose careers in Chesapeake Bay research span nearly 40 years.

Southern Maryland News
2010-02-12

The twin blizzards of 2010 have broken historic records for snowfall in our region and challenged the current working generations to maintain essential services that we normally take for granted.

WAMU (NPR) News
2010-02-11

Road salt is good news for drivers because it means less icy roads. But some environmental experts are concerned about the effects that salt will have on our waterways.