UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

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Discover Magazine's Intersections Blog
2010-01-13

My latest Science Progress blog post looks at the case of a recent Science paper that has had a dramatic impact on the debate over so-called "MTR"–an extremely destructive and invasive form of mini

Northern Neck News
2010-01-13

The cold waters of the Chesapeake Bay are stirring up a heated debate over new regulations from the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

The Washington Post
2010-01-13

Q: If we're so worried about global warming why has it been so cold here in the U.S., in Europe and other parts of the globe? What do weather statistics say has happened during the past 50 years?

The Associated Press
2010-01-12

CAMBRIDGE, Md. (AP) ― Statues depicting Don Pedro, a famed Spanish ram imported by E.I. DuPont, will once again grace the entrance to a former DuPont estate.

The Salisbury Daily Times
2010-01-12

In June the staff of the Maryland Coastal Bays Program was proud to release one of our most important accomplishments: a book focusing on the environmental and cultural changes in the watershed.

Nature News
2010-01-11

The toxins produced by some algal blooms may have evolved to give predatory algae an advantage when it comes to capturing their prey, researchers say.

The Easton Star Democrat
2010-01-11

CAMBRIDGE - Don Pedro will be returning to the entrance of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science-Horn Point Laboratory after laboratory officials determined a damaged du Pont ram

Watertown (NY) Daily News
2010-01-11

A group of 12 scientists who have studied the environmental effects of mountaintop mining strongly condemn the practice and recommend that the government stop granting permits for it.

Washington Post News Service
2010-01-10

Mountaintop coal mining - in which Appalachian peaks are blasted off and stream valleys buried under tons of rubble - is so destructive that the government should stop giving out new permits to do it,

The Washington Post
2010-01-08

Mountaintop coal mining -- in which Appalachian peaks are blasted off and stream valleys buried under tons of rubble -- is so destructive that the government should stop giving out new permits to do it, a group of scientists said in a paper released Thursday.