UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

Our researchers are recognized for their ability to explain today’s complex issues in ways that help non-scientists better understand our environment.

To reach an expert, contact Amy Pelsinsky at 410-330-1390 or apelsinsky@umces.edu.

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Ensia
2016-03-25

March 25, 2016 — Coastal dead zones, global warming, excess algae blooms, acid rain, ocean acidification, smog, impaired drinking water quality, an expanding ozone hole and biodiversity loss.

WBOC (Salisbury) Television
2016-03-24

CAMBRIDGE, Md.- A bill passed Wednesday in the Maryland senate calls for the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Sciences, or UMCES, to conduct a study of the public oyster fishery.

Fusion
2016-03-24

Prairie dogs are cute. They scamper in and out of holes in the ground and stand on two legs staring towards the sun.

Business Insider (India)
2016-03-24

White-tailed prairie dogs are cuddly-looking vegetarians.

But as scientists are now learning, they're also vicious killers of herbivorous Wyoming ground squirrels.

The Talbot Spy
2016-03-24

The Chesapeake Bay and its rivers are the lifeblood of the Eastern Shore.

New Scientist
2016-03-23

Species: white-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys leucurus) Habitat: prairies of central US

The Atlantic
2016-03-23

The first time it happened, it was over so quickly that John Hoogland almost missed it. It was a spring day in 2007.

Smithsonian Magazine
2016-03-23

Most people accept that animals kill other animals for food, to protect their young or to defend a carcass or other food stash—it's the circle of life and all that.

Atlas Obscura
2016-03-23

Prairie dogs are considered cute by many North Americans, even Teddy Roosevelt, who once called them "the most noisy and inquisitive animals imaginable."

Daily Mail (UK)
2016-03-23

Think of a prairie dog, and colonies of super sociable whooping rodents throwing their paws in the air, springs to mind.