UMCES in the Media

Palmer on Colbert Report

Thanks to cutting-edge research on today's most pressing environmental problems, we are developing new ideas to help guide our state, nation and world toward a more environmentally sustainable future.

Our researchers are recognized for their ability to explain today’s complex issues in ways that help non-scientists better understand our environment.

To reach an expert, contact Amy Pelsinsky at 410-330-1390 or apelsinsky@umces.edu.

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WTOP Radio News
2016-03-17

HAGERSTOWN, Md. (AP) — Scientists analyzing the genetics of bats killed by wind turbines say some species may be better able to absorb losses than others.

WV Public Broadcasting
2016-03-17

West Virginia among the states where scientists are analyzing the genetics of bats killed by wind turbines. Scientists say some species may be better able to absorb losses than others.

Physorg
2016-03-17

Wind energy is a growing alternative to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels.

Science 2.0
2016-03-17

Thanks to government mandates and ongoing subsidies, wind energy has become more popular, and one impact of large-scale wind energy development has been widespread mortality of bats.

Science Codex
2016-03-17

FROSTBURG, MD (March 17, 2016) -- Wind energy is a growing alternative to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels.

Dorchester Banner
2016-03-15

CAMBRIDGE — Resource Asset Management Solutions (RAMSLLC), located in Cambridge, a provider of services for the utility industry, was celebrated at a thank you reception at the Horn Point Laborator

The Baltimore Sun
2016-03-14

St. Mary's College of Maryland was warned earlier this month that its accreditation could be in jeopardy if it does not address how it assesses student learning.

My Eastern Shore MD
2016-03-14

CAMBRIDGE — A donation from one of the newer businesses to move to Cambridge will help keep a summer program for local children going for another year at University of Maryland Center for Environme