Press Releases

Media Contact:
Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389

FROSTBURG, MD (April 23, 2014)--Meet the scientists working in your community, participate in hands-on experiments for the whole family and explore ways in which you can help to protect and preserve our environment at a community Open House at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science's Appalachian Laboratory on Saturday, May 3 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

BALTIMORE, MD (April 17, 2014)--Algae from the Chesapeake Bay could be key to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Institute of Marine and EnvironmentalTechnology (IMET) has been named a winner in the first round of the Change and Emissions Management Corporation (CCEMC)’s $35 million international Grand Challenge: Innovative Carbon Uses for its work in using algae to capture carbon dioxide.

CUMBERLAND, MD (April 11, 2014)--The University System of Maryland (USM) Board of Regents has selected two faculty members from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science—Dr. Keith Eshleman and Dr. Andrew Elmore­—to receive the 2014 USM Regents’ Faculty Award, the highest honor that the Board bestows to recognize exemplary faculty achievement. This is the first time that two of the Center’s faculty members have been honored in the same year.

Case studies show best management practices have lowered pollution

ANNAPOLIS, MD (February 25, 2014)--Pollution-reducing practices can improve water quality in the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams, according to new research. Case studies show that “best management practices”—including upgrading wastewater treatment plants, lowering vehicle and power plant emissions, and reducing runoff from farmland—have lowered nutrients and sediment in local waterways. New Insights: Science-based evidence of water quality improvements, challenges, and opportunities in the Chesapeake compiles data collected and analyzed by Chesapeake Bay Program partners, including the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and the U.S. Geological Survey. 

BALTIMORE, MD (February 3, 2014) –Those two crooked beady eyes peeking out of a the shell do more than just help blue crabs spot food in the murky waters of the Chesapeake Bay. They also produce important hormones responsible for the growth and development of a crab from an adolescent into a full-fledged adult. Scientists at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology in Maryland recently discovered a new hormone in those eyestalks responsible for forming body parts that make it possible for female crabs to mate and raise young.

FROSTBURG, MD (December 4, 2013) –Mating with more than one male increases reproductive success for female prairie dogs, despite an increase in risks. This is according to a new study published in The Journal of Mammalogy by behavioral ecologist John Hoogland, Professor at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Appalachian Laboratory.

SOLOMONS, MD (November 13, 2013) –Scientists have been tracking the movements of whales, seals, seabirds and turtles along the west coast to identify hot spots that could be better managed to protect marine life from human impacts. A new study reveals areas where human impacts are highest on marine predators. 

Declines in atmospheric nitrogen pollution improved water quality over a 23-year period

FROSTBURG, MD (November 6, 2013) –  A new study shows that the reduction of pollution emissions from power plants in the mid-Atlantic is making an impact on the quality of the water that ends up in the Chesapeake Bay. The study by scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science confirms that as the amount of emissions of nitrogen oxide from coal-fired power plants declined in response to the Clean Air Act, the amount of nitrogen pollution found in the waterways of forested areas in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia fell as well.

SOLOMONS, MD (November 4, 2013) – Growth in offshore wind generation is expected to play a major role in meeting carbon reduction targets around the world, but the impact of construction noise on marine species is yet unknown. A group of scientists from the United Kingdom and the United States have developed a method to assess the potential impacts of offshore wind farm construction on marine mammal populations, particularly the noise made while driving piles into the seabed to install wind turbine foundations. Their work is published in the November issue of Environmental Impact Assessment Review.

FROSTBURG, MD (October 3, 2013)– Where a stream ends is clear, but where it begins can be more difficult to discern. Researchers from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have developed a new method to solve this problem, resulting in a new map of the Potomac River watershed stream network that significantly improves the information needed for assessing the impact of urbanization on aquatic ecosystems.

CAMBRIDGE, MD (September 3, 2013)–The Horn Point Laboratory invites the public to take part in its annual Community Open House from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 12, 2013. Located on the banks of the Choptank River on Maryland's Eastern Shore, the laboratory is renowned for its study of marine ecosystems. The theme for this year’s event is “Science – Charting a Course for the Bay.” It features exhibits by the laboratory’s scientists of their investigations in the Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas along the Atlantic and around the world.

SOLOMONS, MD (August 13, 2013)--The Chesapeake Biological Laboratory rededicates the Fisheries Research Complex in honor of Eugene Cronin, the lab’s second director and passionate advocate for health of the Chesapeake Bay, on August 20 at 2 p.m. The complex, in which ecological and toxicology research is conducted, will officially be renamed the L. Eugene Cronin Laboratory.