Press Releases

Media Contact:
Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389

FROSTBURG, MD (August 5, 2015)--Is it possible to truly restore a stream disturbed by housing developments and road construction? Can it return to its natural state, complete with buzzing insects and fish and worms that wiggle through its muddy bottom? Ecologist Robert Hilderbrand is about the find out.

Low river flow and nutrient loading reason for smaller predicted size

CAMBRIDGE, MD (June 23, 2015)--Scientists are expecting that this year’s Chesapeake Bay hypoxic low-oxygen zone, also called the “dead zone,” will be approximately 1.37 cubic miles – about the volume of 2.3 million Olympic-size swimming pools. While still large, this is 10 percent lower than the long-term average as measured since 1950.

New book shows how the last four decades of technological advances have uncovered hidden migration behaviors of fish

SOLOMONS, MD (June 4, 2015)--"Imagine the clandestine lives of marine fishes,” begins “Migration Ecology of Marine Fishes,” a new book by Dr. David Secor, one of the most respected voices in marine fish migration studies. Their movements, social interactions, and favorite spots are all obscured beneath the surface. However, an explosion of technological advances in data gathering and analysis has allowed fisheries scientists to observe the secret lives of fish in a whole new way.

Increase in harmful algal blooms shows more is work needed to reduce nutrient pollution of Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries

CAMBRIDGE, MD (May 11, 2015)—A recent study of harmful algal blooms in the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science show a marked increase in these ecosystem-disrupting events in the past 20 years that are being fed by excess nitrogen runoff from the watershed.  While algal blooms have long been of concern, this study is the first to document their increased frequency in the Bay and is a warning that more work is needed to reduce nutrient pollution entering the Bay's waters.

ANNAPOLIS, MD (May 6, 2015) – Dr. Mario Tamburri, Research Professor at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory and an expert in coastal observing systems, has been honored by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science with the President's Award for Excellence in Application of Science. Tamburri was recognized for his leadership in applying innovative and well-tested environmental sensor technologies and in steadfastly working to reduce the risk of invasive species through maritime transportation.

ANNAPOLIS, MD (May 1, 2015)—The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s second annual Commencement ceremony was held on Friday, May 1, at the Maryland Inn in Annapolis and featured Dr. Holly A. Bamford ’02, Acting Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Management for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, as keynote speaker. 

FROSTBURG, MD (April 21, 2015)—Did you know there could be something other than water in the rain? Have you ever seen a tree breathe? Did you know that not all scientists wear lab coats?  Visit the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science's Appalachian Laboratory for a free Open House on Saturday, May 2, from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. to find out. Learn about Maryland’s flying mammals, what lurks in pond scum, and more. 

FROSTBURG, MD (April 16, 2015) – In honor of outstanding contributions to environmental management in Western Maryland, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science's Appalachian Laboratory has selected Janice Keene, president of the Evergreen Heritage Center Foundation, as recipient of its 2015 Richard A. Johnson Environmental Education Award. Since 2008, Ms. Keene has led the Evergreen Heritage Center in Frostburg, a public charity dedicated to providing experiential learning opportunities for children and adults while teaching them to be good stewards of the environment.

SOLOMONS, MD (April 10, 2015)—When Professor Tom Miller first arrived at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s historic Chesapeake Biological Laboratory 20 years ago, he knew little about blue crabs. Today, he knows more than most people in Maryland and has been at the forefront in advances in blue crab management in the Chesapeake Bay. This Friday, the University System of Maryland (USM) Board of Regents honored Dr. Miller the 2015 USM Regents’ Faculty Award for Public Service, the highest honor that the Board bestows to recognize exemplary faculty achievement.

FROSTBURG, MD (April 9, 2015)--Nitrogen fertilizers make it possible to feed more people in the world than ever before. However, too much of it can also harm the environment. Professor Eric Davidson, director of the UMCES Appalachian Laboratory, has been leading a group of scientists, economists, social scientists, and agriculture experts in figuring out how to produce more food while lowering pollution at the same time. He calls it a “Mo Fo Lo Po”: more food, low pollution.

Recognized for 30-year career working to understand how Arctic marine ecosystems respond to environmental change

SOLOMONS, MD (March 10, 2015)--Dr. Jacqueline Grebmeier, research professor and a biological oceanographer at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), has been recognized for exceptional and sustained contributions to the understanding of the Arctic by the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), an international scientific organization that supports leading-edge research through coordination by 22 member countries with Arctic research programs. Her research is focused on understanding how arctic marine ecosystems respond to environmental change, particularly efforts that illuminate the importance of biological systems living on the bottom of Arctic seas.

Baltimore, MD (March 4, 2015)–Dr. Russell Hill, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science professor and director of the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, has been elected to Fellowship in the American Academy of Microbiology. The Academy, the honorific leadership group within the American Society for Microbiology, recognizes excellence, originality, and leadership in the microbiological sciences, and election to this group is a mark of distinction. Academy Fellows are eminent leaders in the field of microbiology and are relied upon for authoritative advice and insight on critical issues in microbiology.