Press Releases

Media Contact:
Amy Pelsinsky
apelsinsky@umces.edu
410-330-1389

ANNAPOLIS, MD (February 13, 2017)— A new study links a long-term decline in Chesapeake Bay’s eelgrass beds to both deteriorating water quality and rising summertime temperatures. It also shows that loss of the habitat and other benefits that eelgrass provides comes at a staggering ecological cost.

BALTIMORE, MD (January 26, 2017)—A group scientists have used new genetic sequencing data to understand how an ancient organism that lived alongside the dinosaurs has evolved over millions of years. A four-year effort by a genetic research team from a dozen universities has uncovered for the first time the biology and evolution of dinoflagellates, tiny but complex organisms primarily known as marine plankton.

Adelphi, MD (Dec. 19, 2016) -- Robert L. Caret, chancellor of the University System of Maryland (USM), today announced his appointment of the search and screening committee for the president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES),  one of the university system's 12 institutions.

ANNAPOLIS, MD (December 5, 2016)—Walter Boynton, a fixture in the world of Chesapeake Bay science for more than 40 years and a longtime professor and estuarine ecologist at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, received the prestigious Mathias Medal Friday night to recognize his distinguished career of outstanding scientific research that has contributed to informed environmental policy in the Chesapeake Bay region.

Satellite tracking informs maps of blue whale density off West Coast

SOLOMONS, MD (November 29, 2016)--Scientists have long used satellite tags to track blue whales along the West Coast, learning how the largest animals on the planet find enough small krill to feed on to support their enormous size. Now researchers from NOAA Fisheries, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, and Oregon State University have combined that trove of tracking data with satellite observations of ocean conditions to develop the first system for predicting locations of blue whales off the West Coast.

FROSTBURG, MD (October 26, 2016)--NASA astronaut and University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science alumnus Ricky Arnold will present “Reflections on a Journey to the International Space Station” followed by a question-and-answer session on Thursday, Nov. 10, at 6:30 pm in Frostburg State University's Pealer Recital Hall in the Performing Arts Center. The family-friendly event is a presentation of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Appalachian Laboratory and Frostburg State University (FSU) and is free and open to the public.

FROSTBURG, MD (September 28)--Roughly over a quarter of the golden eagles killed at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area in Northern California from 2012-2014 were recent immigrants to the local population, according to research led by the U.S. Geological Survey. The results illustrate how golden eagle populations are interconnected across the western U.S. and suggest that golden eagle deaths, or mitigation for those deaths, at one location may impact populations in other areas. 

UMCES’ leader will leave legacy in science and Chesapeake Bay restoration

CAMBRIDGE, MD (September 20, 2016)—President Donald Boesch has announced his intent to conclude his leadership role at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) on August 31, 2017. Appointed UMCES’ fifth chief executive in 1990, Dr. Boesch has led an institution with an excellent reputation for Chesapeake Bay science to global prominence in coastal watershed science and its application, building highly capable research facilities at each of the Center’s four laboratories, and attaining accreditation for UMCES’ program in graduate education in the marine and environmental sciences.

Warming climate triggers changes in forests’ impact on cleaner water

FROSTBURG, MD (September 12, 2016)—A warming climate is causing earlier springs and later autumns in eastern forests of the United States, lengthening the growing season for trees and potentially changing how forests function. Scientists from the Appalachian Laboratory of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science used a combination of satellite images and field measurements to show that trees have greater demand for soil nitrogen in years with early springs

CAMBRIDGE, MD (September 8, 2016)—The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, a leading research and educational institute dedicated to understanding and managing our natural resources, recently appointed J. Mitchell Neitzey, President, CEO and Chief Investment Officer of EFO Capital Management, Inc., to its Board of Visitors. 

CAMBRIDGE, MD (August 25, 2016)—The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, a leading research and educational institute dedicated to understanding and managing our natural resources, recently appointed Joe Suarez, Executive Advisor with Community Partnerships for Booz Allen Hamilton, to its Board of Visitors.

Analysis of paleoclimate records shows a rapid response of climate to fossil fuel burning

SOLOMONS, MD (August 25, 2016)—Close to 200 years ago, the Industrial Revolution drove thousands away from working the land to toil in factories in cities, where machine production changed our entire way of life. A new study shows that this major societal shift also triggered simultaneous changes in our climate. An international research project has shown that the increases in temperatures we are witnessing today started about 180 years ago and confirms previous findings that human activity is the cause of modern global warming.