University of MarylandCenter for Environmental Science

Guiding our state, nation, and world toward a more sustainable future.

Research Highlights

Using sound, scientists search murky Bay waters

Two scientists at Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, with help from Maryland Sea Grant, are collaborating to learn about the local abundance and ecological role of the largely elusive mysid shrimp in Chesapeake Bay.

Research Highlights

Making a Maryland oyster

Geneticist Louis Plough of Horn Point Laboratory wants to breed an oyster that excels in low-salinity waters, such as those that characterize the Maryland part of Chesapeake Bay.
oyster breeding

Research Highlights

Extracting new science from ancient pollen

A team of scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are working to find and sequence DNA held within the ancient pollen of trees and compare it with what they find in the same species rooted on today’s landscape. By examining genes and isotopes held within these trees from the past and present, the scientists can draw better conclusions about how trees may respond to ongoing and future climate changes.
Cones weigh down the top of a red spruce tree.

Our Campuses

Appalachian Laboratory
Learn More
Chesapeake Biological Laboratory
Learn More
Horn Point Laboratory
Learn More
Institute of Marine & Environmental Technology
Learn More
Integration & Application Network
Learn More
Water meets marsh and land
Maryland Sea Grant College
Learn More
3
4
2
5
7
6

Appalachian Laboratory

Located in the mountains of western Maryland, the headwaters of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, scientists study the effects of land-use change on the freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems of the region, how they function in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and how human activity may influence their health and sustainability on local, regional, and global scales.
Learn More

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory

Located where the Patuxent River meets the Chesapeake Bay, the oldest publicly supported marine laboratory on the East Coast is a national leader in research on fisheries, estuarine ecology, environmental chemistry, and toxicology research of the Chesapeake Bay and aquatic ecosystem around the globe.
Learn More

Horn Point Laboratory

From the banks of the Choptank River on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, scientists engage in world-renowned research in oceanography, water quality, restoration of sea grasses, marshes and shellfish, and expertise in ecosystem modeling.
Learn More

Institute of Marine & Environmental Technology

Located in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, scientists pursue cutting-edge research in microbiology, molecular biology, and biotechnology, using marine microbes to develop alternative energy, and supporting sustainable aquaculture and fisheries.
Learn More

Integration & Application Network

The Integration and Application Network (IAN) is a dedicated group of scientists intent on solving, not just studying environmental problems.
Learn More

Maryland Sea Grant College

Fostering strong connections between researchers and natural resource managers working to restore the Chesapeake Bay.
Learn More

Applied Ecology & Conservation Biology

Gain scientific training in addressing conservation issues, especially those pertaining to the persistence of native communities in a changing environment, landscape fragmentation, conservation/development conflicts, watershed assessment, and integrated resource management.
Find Out More

Earth & Ocean Sciences

Students explore the movement and transformation of materials and energy between mountain headwater and estuarine, coastal, and oceanic systems. Topics include landscape dynamics, physical circulation and transport, chemical transformation, and biological reaction.
Find Out More

Ecological Systems

Spanning the Arctic to the Chesapeake Bay, students study a variety of topics, from landscape ecology to ecological genomics, to fisheries stock assessment. Research is focused on understanding the interactions between organisms and their environment, leading to valuable scientific discovery.
Find Out More

Environment & Society

Integrating the social and environmental sciences, students will study concepts including coupled natural and human systems, cultural models of the environment, political ecology, participation and governance, ecological economics, and environmental ethics.
Find Out More

Environmental Molecular Science & Technology

Students use current molecular approaches to study biodiversity, bioremediation, food chains, discovery of drugs and enzymes from marine microbes and macoorganisms, sustainable aquaculture, biofuels, biogeochemistry of carbon cycling, and genomics/metabolomics of marine organisms.
Find Out More

Molecular Medicine & Toxicology

Developing scientists can pursue training in molecular and mechanistic toxicology and toxicology and environmental health, including mechanisms of cell injury, carcinogenesis, reproductive toxicology, neurotoxicology, aquatic toxicology, and environmental epidemiology and toxicology.
Find Out More

Molecular Microbiology & Immunology

Learn to take the lead in this program that provides interactive, multifaceted education, and research training to present students a comprehensive education in molecular and cell biology, microbiology and immunology.
Find Out More

Wildlife & Fisheries Biology

This program will prepare you for research and management positions within the public and private sectors. The program allows flexibility, yet offers courses necessary for certification as a biologist with various professional organizations.
Find Out More

What's New

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory Giving Tuesday Challenge

An anonymous donor and longtime friend and supporter of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Chesapeake Biological Laboratory has come forward to offer a matching challenge grant of up to $10,000.

e-DNA emerges as powerful tool for tracking threatened river herring in Chesapeake Bay

Researchers have found that tracking and quantifying herring DNA from the environment corresponded well to more traditional field methods and has great potential to assist future monitoring efforts of river herring abundance and habitat use.

Growing noise in the ocean can cause dolphins to change their calls

Researchers from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science laid underwater microphones on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean to find out more about the ambient noise levels in the area off the coast of Maryland.