Press Room

The University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) is a leading research and educational institution working to understand and manage the world’s resources. From a network of laboratories spanning from the Allegheny Mountains to the Atlantic Ocean, UMCES scientists provide sound advice to help state and national leaders manage the environment and prepare future scientists to meet the global challenges of the 21st century. 

A blue map with pinpoints and markers indicating the locations of UMCES' labs and initiatives.

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Amy Pelsinsky, Director of Communications
410-330-1389 / apelsinsky@umces.edu

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Recent Press Releases

Large summer ‘dead zone’ forecast for Chesapeake Bay after wet winter and spring

Ecologists are forecasting a large Chesapeake Bay “dead zone” in 2019 due to well-above-average river flows associated with increased rainfall in the watershed since last fall.

Help scientists track dolphins in the Chesapeake Bay

The Chesapeake DolphinWatch app is back for the 2019 summer season with new features, including the ability to upload videos of dolphins spotted on the bay by citizen scientists.

NOAA names University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science part of Cooperative Institute

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has named UMCES as part of a new Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region to study the Northeast continental shelf ecosystem.

Recent News

Large ‘dead zone’ forecast for Chesapeake Bay after wet winter and spring

Ecologists are forecasting a large Chesapeake Bay “dead zone” in 2019 due to well-above-average river flows associated with increased rainfall in the watershed since last fall.

Popular dolphin tracker app is back for third year

The Chesapeake DolphinWatch app is back for the 2019 summer season with new features, including the ability to upload videos of dolphins spotted on the bay by citizen scientists.

Next Generation: Zach Gotthardt

I’m studying the biogeochemistry of a polluted estuary and how it responds to aeration, the addition of oxygen to the system. My research focuses on a small tidal sub-estuary downstream of Baltimore called Rock Creek, a system that is high in nutrients.