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Appalachian Laboratory hosts Open House - Saturday, May 3

April 16, 2014

Join the team to help restore the American Chestnut tree, learn about critters found in Maryland’s forests, and talk to experts about brook trout and fracking at a free Open House at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science's Appalachian Laboratory. On Saturday, May 3 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m., learn about science with hands-on experiments for the whole family, meet the scientists working in your community, and enjoy a GPS cache hunt outside.

The Appalachian Laboratory is located at 301 Braddock Road, just ¼ mile north of exit 33 on Interstate 68. Parking is free. For more information, call 301-689-7100.

The Appalachian Laboratory is home to state-of-the-art research on plant and soil ecology, water resources, wildlife ecology, and conservation biology. Three floors of the laboratory will feature hands-on learning about science, including research unique to Allegany County.

This year’s Open House is being held in partnership with Frostburg State University and Allegany County Public Schools’ Western Maryland STEM Festival. 

Hands-on, family-friendly science experiments include:

  • Join our research team to help restore American Chestnut trees: Come by to learn about how you an participate in a “citizen science” project to restore these majestic native trees, including getting your own seedling!
  • Pollen Detectives: Investigate and discover how Maryland’s forests have changed in response to climate change since the last Ice Age by using fossil pollen from the past.
  • Critter Nation: View and learn about critters found in local forests and streams like salamanders, snakes, and fish. 
  • Bat Time: Learn why bats are important to our ecosystems, how they use echoloation and more. Build a bat to take home with you!
  • How can you detect water pollution?: Learn how scientists use chemistry to detect and pinpoint sources of water pollution.

An Experts Corner will feature researchers discussing shale gas development, brook trout, a and species diversity.