A statement from President Peter Goodwin on UMCES’ commitment to diversity

News

Maryland offshore wind farm could become stop-over region for migrating striped bass and Atlantic sturgeon

June 25, 2020
Authors suggest that the development of wind farms on the DelMarVa coastal shelf, 17-26 miles from Ocean City’s shoreline, may alter the migratory behavior of Atlantic sturgeon and the commercially and recreationally important striped bass as new wind turbines in this otherwise featureless region could create habitat around which fish linger.

Underwater grasses help to offset acidification in the Chesapeake Bay

June 10, 2020
Scientists have discovered that the recent comeback of underwaters grasses in Chesapeake Bay not only removes nutrient pollution and provides habitat for baby crabs and rockfish, but may also offset the growing problem of acidification as climate change impacts the nation’s largest estuary.

Next Generation: Hunter Hughes on reconstructing past climate with coral skeletons

June 2, 2020
My research looks at how we use the chemistry of coral skeletons to reconstruct past climate. We can use corals to reconstruct historical temperature data, using the chemical composition of corals and the chemistry of the sea water surrounding them.

Mike Wilberg earns award for science and communication on oyster management

June 1, 2020
Professor Michael Wilberg was awarded the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s President’s Award for Excellence in Application of Science for his ongoing and impactful efforts on the science and outstanding communication of oyster management with stakeholders, partners, and policymakers.

Large rockfish leave Chesapeake Bay to become ocean migrators; smaller fish remain

May 14, 2020
A new electronic tagging study of 100 Potomac River striped bass sheds light on rockfish migration in Chesapeake Bay and the Atlantic Coast. University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science researchers found that when rockfish reach 32 inches in length they leave Chesapeake Bay and become ocean migrators.

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