News

Research team receives $10M to transform shellfish farming with smart technology

June 26, 2020
UMCES researcher Matt Gray and a group of researchers and institutions throughout the U.S. received a $10M grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to bring advanced technology to the domestic shellfish aquaculture industry.

Bay 101: A virtual seminar series, science of the Chesapeake for non-scientists

June 25, 2020
Every Wednesday from July 8 through August 5 from 5:00 to 5:30 pm Horn Point Laboratory researchers will share a free, online seminar series about the science of the Chesapeake Bay. The thirty-minute programs will shed light into the mysteries of the Bay and highlight Horn Point programs working to improve the health of the Bay and its aquatic life.

Professor Matt Gray on the filtration capabilities of oysters

May 20, 2020
Oysters are filter feeders that can help clean up the Chesapeake Bay, right? Many have seen the various web videos showing a dozen or so bivalves clearing a murky fish tank in just an hour. But are they such ecological superheroes that each one can siphon 50 gallons of water in a day? Is it true? Well, yes, but not so much in the real world, according to Matthew Gray, a scientist at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science’s Horn Point Laboratory.

Faculty Spotlight: An Interview with Jamie Pierson

May 19, 2020
I study a type of animal plankton. They’re called copepods, and they are plankton their entire life. These are tiny little animals that are about 1 to 3 millimeter long, usually. Copepods are probably the most numerous animal on earth. There's 15 or 16,000 named species right now, and we think there are probably more than that that we haven't discovered yet,

UMCES researchers examine healthy urban waterfronts around the world

May 4, 2020
Healthy Harbors are important for both the communities that surround them and the animals that live in them. Urban waterfronts, including harbors and ports, are a defining feature of coastal cities and serve as gateways to the rest of the world. HPL's Judy O'Neil co-edited a special issue of Regional Studies of Marine Science by the World Harbours Project, which featured several papers by UMCES researchers on harbors around the globe, from Guanabara Bay adjacent to Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) where urban development continues to degrade water quality and ecosystem health to Boston Harbor’s transformation from the “harbor of shame” to a vibrant coastal resource.

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